4 mREITs Yielding Over 8%

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“Regular” REITs typically buy physical properties, find someone to manage them, and lease them out. They collect rent checks and avoid paying taxes on most of these profits if they distribute 90% of their profits as payouts. This is the reason REIT stocks typically boast big yields.

Mortgage REITs (mREITs), on the other hand, don’t own buildings. They own paper. Specifically, they buy mortgage loans and collect the interest. How do they make money? By borrowing “short” (assuming short-term rates are lower) and lending “long” (if long-term rates are, as they tend to be, higher).

This business model prints money when long-term rates are steady or, better yet, declining.… Read more

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America’s in a dividend desert, and that’s forcing income hunters to get creative. Are 10.1% paying mREITs the answer?

The S&P 500 hasn’t yielded this poorly (1.7%) in roughly a decade. T-notes deliver a fractional yield. Worse, even areas of traditionally elevated yield are offering just so-so payouts right now. At less than 4% on average, high-yield stocks and real estate investment trusts (REITs) will put retirement investors well short of their income goals.

The good news? A pair of market niches—business development companies (BDCs) and mortgage REITs—can put 3x that amount of money into our pockets.

I recently pointed readers to a “3-click” BDC portfolio yielding 10.9%, which is a little less than the BDC average of 12%.… Read more

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Most dividend investors understandably love the idea of an 8% No Withdrawal Portfolio. It’s a simple yet “game changing” idea that you don’t hear much from mainstream pundits and advisors.

Find stocks that pay 7%, 8% or more and you can retire comfortably, living off dividend checks while your initial capital stays intact (or even appreciates).

Now this strategy is a bit more complicated than simply finding 8% yields and buying them. Granted the recent stock market pullback has benefited investors like us because we can snag more dividends for our dollar. Yields are higher overall, and that’s a good thing.… Read more

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Groucho Marx famously said: “I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member.”

When it comes to dividends, the 10% Club isn’t usually a badge of honor either. That’s because bigger isn’t usually better when you’re talking about dividend yields.

The FOMC has targeted short-term rates of between 1.75% to 2.00% in the U.S. and the yield on the benchmark 10-year note is hovering around 3%. Almost any other income investment can be priced based off these rates, depending on how much extra risk you’re willing to take on.

Historically-speaking, any time a stock is paying more than seven percentage points above the AAA-rated, government-secured debt, investors begin to question if the dividend is sustainable.…
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With great yield comes great risk.

A double-digit yielder is a pretty rare thing. Among the 7,000 or so stocks, exchange-traded funds and closed-end funds on the market, a relative handful (135) dole out 10% or more in annual income. And because sky-high yields are often the product of tanking share prices or excessive risk, many of them are traps – and only a select few are worth considering. Today, I’m going to show you a trio of stocks that yield more than 12% and have earned a closer examination.

But first, let me show you just how rough it is for the big-income club.…
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