These “Great American Reset” Stocks Will Create Fortunes

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Another hand went up. I pointed for the next question.

When you consider dividend investments, Brett, what is more important in your opinion:

  • The current yield and value of the stock itself, or
  • The “engine” that is driving the business and the profits?

“Great question,” I replied. “The business engine. Always consider where the cash flow is coming from, first.”

In other words, if the business is humming, the dividends will be there. And as the payout keeps chugging along, so will the stock price. A dividend will protect the stock from downside and, with growth, provide a sweet kicker of upside.… Read more

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Everything is expensive—except for these dividend payers.

These bargains are left on the board because they fell so far, so fast in 2020 that the market’s subsequence bounce couldn’t quite pull them out of the gutter.

So, yields of 8.9% remain, with 89% price upside attached to them to boot. This “sure bet” sector is consolidating as we speak. Make a note of it, because when this breather wraps up, these dividend stocks could really soar.

We’ll talk specifics on these out-of-favor plays in a moment. First, let’s appreciate why this “free dividend money” is sitting out there for us to scoop up.… Read more

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Exactly who is retiring on the income from safe bonds in 2021?

You might remember when, once upon a time, the 10-year Treasury was a source of acceptable retirement yield:

  • Thirty years ago, we could get 7% or more for sitting on high-quality U.S. debt,
  • Twenty years ago, we could still gather 6%,
  • Even a decade ago, we were pocketing a respectable 4%.

Today? We can’t even collect a lousy 1% yield!

Buying Treasury Bonds? Congrats—You’re Broke!

Put a million bucks into 10-year Treasuries and we’re banking just $9,500 per year in income. That’s below poverty levels. Yikes.

Things aren’t any better on the stock side.… Read more

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The mainstream crowd has gotten way too greedy—which means we could be in the teeth of a stock-market selloff within weeks.

Most folks hear the word “selloff” and gasp. But not us contrarian dividend hounds! We know that volatility is our friend. It’s easy to see this just by looking at what the market’s done in the last five years. You’d have amped up your performance a lot just by buying the dips.

Buy and Hold? Nah. The Timing of Your Buys (and Sells) Matters

This year is a classic example. If you’d bought the typical S&P 500 stock on the first day of February, pretty much at the go-go peak of early 2020, you’d be sitting on a 15% total return now.… Read more

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Who doesn’t like a safe, stable utility dividend? In today’s zero-rate, VIX-spiking world, it’s a throwback to simpler times—the “old school” type of dividend we’d like to accumulate sufficiently to retire on!

Heck, twenty years ago to this date, we could have bought shares in Southern Company (SO) and enjoyed a 6.5% yield. A $100,000 stake in Southern would have paid $6,500 every year in dividends.

Plus, regular raises were on the way. After a stagnant few years, Southern began hiking its payout every year. That 6.5% yield would eventually grow to a fat 12.4% yield on cost:

Southern’s 20-Year Yield Rise

But wait, there was more.… Read more

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“How fast should I deploy my cash into your dividend stocks?”

It’s a common question from the new income investors that are always finding their way to us (welcome!) We publish a plethora of dividend analysis on our website ContrarianOutlook.com. And, for premium subscribers, we also issue specific buy, hold and sell recommendations for select stocks and funds.

So, where should a new reader (or, better yet, premium subscriber!) start? Let’s walk through some steps you can take to make the best use of our information as you build your dividend-powered retirement portfolio.

First, Pick Your Stocks

Stock picking is step one, and as discussed, we have no shortage of dividend coverage around here.… Read more

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