This “Instant” 5-Stock Portfolio Pays $30,000 a Year (Forever)

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The Contrary Investing Report > NYSE:PDI

Today I want to show you how you can retire on $405,000—and with just five buys, too! Put together, these five stocks and funds hand you a 7.4%-yielding portfolio that will pay you reliably for decades.

First, though, let’s quickly run through how our “5-buy” portfolio will work—and how it proves the so-called “experts,” who say you need a million dollars or more to clock out—are dead wrong.

A Million-Dollar Retirement … for $405K!?

To be smack in the middle of income in America, you need to bring in about $30,000 per year. So, at a 7.4% yield, you’d need to invest $405,000.… Read more

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Nine weeks ago, our fellow income investors were concerned about rising tariff tensions and falling stock prices. (Sound familiar?) So, in late May, we discussed seven dividend payers (yielding 6% on average) that wouldn’t go down if stocks-at-large kept dropping.

The broader markets soon reversed, as they usually do when pessimism is running high. But our defensive dividend machines did even better. Five out of my seven “never go down” plays beat the S&P 500. On average they returned 12.5% (including their big dividends) over the last nine weeks. A percent a week or better will sure boost your retirement account quickly!… Read more

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What’s better than a portfolio that will pay you a $117,000 salary every year in retirement?

How about one that delivers a consistent paycheck each and every month that you can plan all of your regular expenses around?

I’ll show you how, via with three already-diversified high-yield monthly dividend stocks. But first, let me show you how most income investors get it wrong.

Mistake 1: Cheating Themselves on Yield

Sure, yield isn’t everything—you want growth potential, dividend growth potential and safety, too—but it matters. Consider this: Every 1% in yield equates to $10,000 on a $1 million nest egg. Thus, 2% is $20,000, 3% is $30,000, and so forth.… Read more

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Today I’ll show you how I helped investors sidestep a “silent” payout cut in a popular closed-end fund (CEF). We’ll also look at how to approach this fan fave today—and how this tale can help us keep our nest eggs (and income!) safe.

Calling Out the Cool Kid

I’m talking about the PIMCO Dynamic Income Fund (PDI), which I flagged nearly two years ago, when it was at the height of its fame thanks to its outsized 9% dividend yield.

Even though first-level investors couldn’t get enough of PDI, I fired off a warning flare, writing that its massive 8.4% premium to net asset value (NAV, or the value of the corporate and government bonds and mortgage-backed securities it held) was under threat.… Read more

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Since launching my CEF Insider service in early 2018, the picks I’ve given subscribers have outperformed the broader CEF market. That’s prompted a lot of people to ask me how I choose the CEFs I do—especially in a market as wild as the one we’ve seen in the last couple months.

My process is both complicated and straightforward. I have a checklist of 52 points I go through to choose the right fund. I apply these one by one, first using some of the broader points to screen funds, then zooming in closer, using more complex analysis to bring you my very best buys.… Read more

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I’m sure you noticed that when America decided on a Republican-majority Senate and Democrat-majority House, the markets jumped.

The best news: it’s just the beginning of what’s likely to be a long-term uptrend in stocks. So if you sold during the recent market panic, you’re going to miss out on that upswing—that is, unless you buy now.

But what to buy? While the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) is already up 3.6% since the end of October, it still has gains ahead because of slower investors who haven’t come back into the market  after last month’s panic selling. If you buy now, you might beat a lot of them to the punch.… Read more

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Even with the 10-year Treasury “rallying” of late, it still pays just 2.9%. Put a million bucks in T-Bills, and you’re banking $29,000 per year. Barely above poverty levels!

Hence the appeal of closed-end funds (CEFs), which often pay 8% or better. That’s the difference between a paltry minimum-wage income of $29,000 on a million saved or a respectable $80,000 annually.

And if you’re smart about your CEF purchases, you can even buy them at discounts and snare some price upside to boot!

Here’s why: CEFs (unlike their ETF and mutual fund cousins) have fixed pools of shares. Meanwhile their prices trade up and down like stocks – which means these funds can sometimes trade at a discount to the value of their underlying assets!… Read more

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There are 20 elite closed-end funds (CEFs) that have proven their toughness in the last 10 years (including through the Great Recession, the most brutal test of all) and have still handed investors market-beating returns.

And below we’re going to look at all 20 of them.

So if you’re looking for a proven dividend payer that will hold its own through today’s troubles—trade wars and rising interest rates, to name just two—these 20 funds are a great place to start.

The Toughest of the Tough

Some of these cash machines throw off dividends of 6.8% or more (and one I’ll tell you about in a moment pays a sky-high 12.4%!).…
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Today, the 10-year Treasury pays just 2.7%. Put a million bucks in T-Bills, and you’re banking $27,000 per year. Barely above poverty levels!

Hence the appeal of closed-end funds (CEFs), which often pay 8% or better. That’s the difference between a paltry minimum-wage income of $27,000 on a million saved or a respectable $80,000 annually.

And if you’re smart about your CEF purchases, you can even buy them at discounts and snare some price upside to boot!

Unfortunately this rising-rate environment has income seekers scared of CEFs. Many of my readers have asked me if they should bail on our high paying vehicles.…
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Today, the 10-year Treasury pays just 2.3%. Put a million bucks in T-Bills, and you’re banking $23,000 per year. Barely above poverty levels!

Hence the appeal of closed-end funds (CEFs), which often pay 8% or better. That’s the difference between a paltry minimum-wage income of $23,000 on a million saved, or a respectable $80,000 annually.

And if you’re smart about your CEF purchases, you can even buy them at discounts and snare some price upside to boot!

Unfortunately this rising rate environment has income seekers scared of CEFs. Many of my readers have asked me if they should bail on our high paying vehicles.…
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