These 10 “Crisis-Proof” Funds Yield Up to 10% (with 17% upside)

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After watching the S&P 500 crash, then levitate, over the past seven months, I’ve come to one conclusion: high-yield closed-end funds (CEFs) are disrespected now—and that makes them a great contrarian buy.

Sure, some CEFs are cheap for a reason (I’m looking at you, energy funds). But there are plenty of undervalued winners, too. And plenty of CEFs have crushed the market this year, including 10 that have returned more than 8%. This top-10 list, which I’ll show you below, includes CEFs that have doubled, tripled—and even quadrupled the S&P 500’s 4% return.

What’s more, these funds all have one thing in common that sets them up for even bigger gains: strong management, proving once again that who manages your money is just as important as what you invest in—especially if you’re looking to boost your portfolio’s income stream with the 7% (or higher) dividends the typical CEF throws off.… Read more

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Here’s a critical mistake anyone can make while hunting for big dividends in a market like today’s: you can buy the right stocks at the right times—and still lose money!

2020 is a good example: even though the S&P 500 is back now positive on the year, you almost certainly suffered some degree of the following wipeout, no matter which stock you would have bought at the start of 2020:

The Headache of Going All in on Stocks

Ask anyone and they’ll likely say the market has been totally unhinged this year; bulls will say stocks shouldn’t have fallen as far as they did in March, and bears will say they shouldn’t have recovered so quickly.… Read more

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There’s a strong buying opportunity unfolding in an ignored corner of the market right now. Steady dividends of 5.8% (and higher) are waiting for savvy contrarians who jump on it.

By “savvy contrarians,” I, of course, mean us!

And the corner of the market I’m referring to is municipal bonds.

If you’ve been following the muni-bond saga over the last two months, you might find my enthusiasm a bit unfounded. After all, the coronavirus is hammering the finances of cities and states across the country and driving up the risk of muni-bond defaults—right? Not so fast.

Your Muni Default Risk? 0.042%Read more

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Far too many investors ignore dividends, especially in a bull market. It’s easy to see why: with stocks racking up yearly double-digit gains, it’s tough to get worked up about a sub-2% payout (which is what most S&P 500 names pay).

But a crisis flips the script, making safe cash dividends a lot more attractive. And luckily for us, there’s one ignored corner of the market where we can grab payouts that triple what the typical stock dribbles out.

That would be in municipal bonds, or “munis,” for short. They’re a kind of debt instrument issued by local governments throughout the US.… Read more

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A trio of reliable monthly dividend payers has been swept up in the pandemic panic. They could be the dirt-cheap buys that have dividend investors kicking themselves this time next year for not “backing up the truck” and buying every monthly paying share in sight.

These closed-end funds (CEFs) as a whole are far smaller than their mutual and exchange-traded brethren, and they’re about as sexy as a doorstop, so they go completely ignored by traditional financial media. But a couple dozen of these have exhibited some downright admirable performance while the rest of the market is tanking around them.

Better still?… Read more

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Your 2% bonds are going to make you broke. You need to buy these safe, higher paying dividends instead.

We’ll get to these “real yields” (up to 9.3%!) in a moment. First, let’s recap. Treasury yields just took their biggest bath in weeks, sending the 10-year T-note to 2%. Less than a year ago, the 10-year was flirting with (a not exactly nosebleed) 3%.

And now that Fed chair Jay Powell has fallen in love with the doves (whether by choice or by force), he’s going to keep rates low for a long time. Which means bonds will have no place in a retirement portfolio geared towards income.… Read more

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