Dividends Soon to Be “Unleashed” for Hikes Up to 100%

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These dividends are about to break free from their regulatory shackles. Once the cuffs are off, we’re going to see payout hikes up to 100%.

Even the dividend growth “laggards” in this group are due for 11% and 17% hikes. As these payouts pop, their stock prices may certainly follow.

Here’s why.

For the past decade, income investors have overlooked the big banks. The Great Recession burned a hole in the brain of every retiree who lived to tell about it.

The U.S. Treasury bailed out America’s financial sector with the Troubled Asset Relief Program, which disbursed roughly $427 billion to buy toxic assets from (and even equity in) U.S.… Read more

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Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise: financial stocks are still a hotbed of dividend (and share-price!) growth for contrarian income-seekers like us.

I know what you’re going to say next: “Brett, everyone says finance stocks are overbought.”

I get it, and that sounds logical … on the surface. 

It is true that when the calendar flipped to January, finance stocks surged, more than doubling the price gains of the S&P 500, going by the performance of the benchmark Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLF):

Finance Stocks on a Tear …

But here’s what most folks have missed: even with that gain, finance stocks are only 20% above where they peaked prior to the last financial crisis 14 years ago.Read more

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A reader recently wrote in to ask:

Brett, if you could only invest in one ticker over the next year, what would it be?

I’d buy a stock backed by three financial trends that are likely to gain more attention in the months ahead. Definitely the type of firm that is due to dominate the “narrative” in 2021.

Don’t worry, this won’t simply be a story stock. Because it’s me, we’re also requiring value and, most importantly, yield with our storytelling.

So let’s start spinning the yarn. We’ll begin with Fed Chair Jay Powell and his prolific printing machine.

2021 Narrative #1: Money Printing

Powell has put on quite the show of late.… Read more

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As we prepare to say farewell (or, good riddance!) to 2020, let’s beat the investing herd and figure out how we can really rake in some cash in 2021. And, in doing so, put this dumpster fire of a year behind us in spectacular fashion.

Why are we having this conversation now? Well, Mr. and Ms. Market love looking ahead. Plus, the “seasonally strong” months for the stock market tend to happen between November 1 and May 1. So, there’s no reason to wait, as the S&P 500 has already returned double-digits just 18 days into this “strong stock season.”… Read more

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“Not for individual resale.”

Ever see that label on a box of food, and scratch your head? Like who’s buying this big-mega bag of Chips Ahoy for the purpose of reselling the “individually packaged” helpings of cookies inside?

While you and I have better things to do than deconstruct groceries, we also have better ways to make money than deconstructing perfectly good bond funds.

My article about “preferred” shares a couple of weeks ago inspired a few questions. We’ve got a few adventurous income colleagues who are interested in unwrapping the perfectly good packaging we discussed. Let’s walk them back from this potential “Chips Ahoy moment” in a moment.… Read more

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The S&P 500 snapped an eight-session winning streak on Tuesday, but U.S. stocks still have strong momentum heading into the first-quarter earnings season.

The index flirted with the 2,900 level this week, which is a price that we haven’t seen since last October. One big change since then is that average U.S. earnings showed 20%-plus year-over-year growth in the first three quarters of 2018 and now we’re staring at the first quarterly earnings decline in the S&P 500 in three years.

The quarterly reports we’ll see over the next few weeks will go a long way to determining if the recent momentum can continue.… Read more

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The “yield curve” has inverted—and that could be terrible news for your dividends!

But don’t worry: there’s a “pullback-proof” way to keep your income and your nest egg secure—no matter if there’s stock-market fire behind all this yield-curve smoke.

Below I’ll reveal three stocks perfectly positioned for whatever lies ahead: if the market tanks, they’ll likely trade flat, thanks to their cheap valuations (and sturdy dividends).

And if it all turns out to be hype and the market keeps rolling higher? They’re poised to skyrocket while handing you a 7.1% average payout (with one of these stealth buys even throwing off an amazing 9.3% yield!).… Read more

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The Dow Jones Industrial Average emerged from correction territory this week, as investors applauded earnings in the financial sector. At the same time, markets chose to ignore the now record-long U.S. government shutdown and ongoing Brexit saga in the U.K.

Financials Start Earnings Season On Positive Note

Bank of America (BAC), Citigroup (C) and Goldman Sachs (GS) all traded higher this week, after posting solid quarterly results. The earnings news was not all rosy however, as Morgan Stanley (MS) fell short of expectations on Thursday. Outside of the financial sector, Ford Motor (F) also cut profit expectations this week.

As the following chart shows, quarterly reporting activity will continue to pick up next week and the floodgates really open in February.… Read more

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Investors stepped in this week to do some value shopping, leading to the longest winning streak for the S&P 500 since last September.

The minutes from the December FOMC meeting were released on Wednesday, suggesting a more patient outlook for future interest rate increases. In fact, Fed funds futures are now pricing in just a 19.2% probability of an interest rate hike in 2019, compared with a 10.4% chance of a rate cut.

According to Bespoke Investment Group, energy names and other cyclical groups have been behind the market’s recent winning streak, which are precisely the names that were a drag in 2019.… Read more

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In late 2007, Citigroup (C) insiders – who should have known better – comforted themselves with a security blanket that, in hindsight, was better fit for a Goodwill donation.

“The dividend’s as safe as the next board meeting,” they told themselves as the yield on their shares climbed well above 10%. On a trailing basis, that is.

Next board meeting, their payout was chopped – and their shares dropped more than 90%.

Stock yields of 10%, 11%, 12% or more are usually too good to be true. Citigroup reminded us why ten years ago, and telecom disaster Frontier Communications (FTR) reinforces the point today.…
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