17 Monthly Dividends That Pay $3,125 Per Month

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Mortgage payments. Car payments. Cell-phone bills. Power bills. Water bills. Credit card bills.

Yuck. They’re the only downside to being retired!

These bills show up (or debit our accounts) every single month. That’s OK when we have a normal j-o-b that pays us every couple of weeks, or every month. But this regular bill gets really old when we retire.

Like you, I prefer to retire on dividends (and leave my nest egg alone). Problem is, most dividends are paid out every quarter, not every month.

So, dividend cash flow is (unfortunately) often out of sync with every-30-day expenses.

Some income investors build out complicated dividend calendars that get knocked out of whack whenever they ever have to sell certain stocks.… Read more

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We’ve just been handed a unique opportunity to grab 7.9%+ dividends—and price upside, too.

Now it does involve some risk, and you’ll have to be quick to reap the biggest gains (and dividends). But there’s one unsung fund that can help you cancel out that risk—and grab a huge payout, too. More on that at the end of this article.

A Contrarian High-Yield REIT Strategy for Huge Cash Payouts

First up, the opportunity we’re going to dive into today revolves around real estate investment trusts (REITs) that invest in shopping malls and other retail properties.

If you’ve been reading columns written by me and my colleague Brett Owens, you know we’ve been critical of retail REITs, which were being decimated by Amazon.comRead more

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These 31 dividends are more than just safe. They are likely going up between now and October!

Recently, S&P Dow Jones Indices’ Howard Silverblatt put a hard number on 2020’s tough dividend decay, writing that second-quarter payouts were whittled down by $42.5 billion during the second quarter. The worst might now be over. Here’s a key excerpt from Silverblatt’s latest note about the month of July (emphasis mine):

“There were significantly fewer dividend actions, as 15 issues increased their dividend rates, one issue initiated dividends, two decreased them (including Wells Fargo’s USD 6.8 billion cut, the second-largest in index history), and one suspended them.Read more

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Right now, millions of people are plowing cash into this market, gambling that the worst of the dividend cuts is behind us.

I hope you’re not one of them, because this “dividend trap” is likely to spring—and steal away the income (and value) these folks have spent years building!

Just look at the numbers: unemployment is likely over 20%. Consumer spending cratered 7.5% in March, before this mess even really got started. And now Uncle Sam is demanding that any company seeking government aid first send its payout to the scrapyard.

Meantime, even cash-rich companies are pulling in their horns, like the Walt Disney Co.Read more

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If you’re like many investors these days, you’re warily eyeing your portfolio, wondering where the next dividend cut will come from.

Fear of dividend cuts is reasonable, even if you hold the Dividend Aristocrats—the 63 S&P 500 firms that have raised their payouts for 25 years (or more). This club includes well-known names like McDonald’s (MCD), Lowe’s (LOW), Kimberly-Clark (KMB) and Procter & Gamble (PG), as well as less familiar firms, like Sysco (SYY), VF Corporation (VFC) and Linde (LIN).

For many folks, the Aristocrats are sacred cows. But the crisis will inevitably force some of these companies to cut payouts in the weeks and months ahead.… Read more

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These 39 stocks are supposed to hike their dividends soon. How many of these raises are still going to happen?

The first-quarter earnings season is approaching, and that typically means a weekly flow of companies announcing upgrades to their regular payouts. Indeed, I’m about to show you 39 stocks, yielding up to 47.9%, that are on the schedule and expected to deliver dividend raises over the next couple of months.

However the sudden bear market has thrown a gigantic monkey wrench into this quarter’s dividend routine. Dividends are dropping like flies.

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Where are you going to find meaningful income to get you through retirement? Not from popular stocks, with the S&P paying less than 2%. And bonds won’t help either, as their yields are in the tank, too.

Instead let’s consider real estate investment trusts (REITs), which are tailor-made for investors who are at or nearing retirement. Specifically, I’d look to dividend-growing REITs, like the three I’m about to show you. This trio of landlords are on pace to double their dividends in just four years.

How Dividend Growth Can Quickly Double Your Money

Respected healthcare REIT Ventas (VTR) is the perfect example of how this strategy can do more than provide income.… Read more

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If you’re a serious dividend investor, you should never trust a stock screener.

They might be OK for blue-chip stocks like Pfizer (PFE) and Procter & Gamble (PG). But these stocks don’t pay enough to properly fund a retirement portfolio powered by dividends anyway.

The big problem with screeners is that they get tripped up when yields get serious. They handle the 2% and 3% payers alright. They’ll spit back a fairly accurate dividend payout ratio based on earnings, and give you price-to-earnings metrics that are fair enough.

But high-yield structures like REITs and BDCs? Forget it. They break the machines.… Read more

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We buy real estate investment trusts (REITs) for their yields first and foremost. Show us the money!

Dividend growth is good, too. A 4% yield looks twice as nice if we believe our income will double in just a few years.

After all, a 4% payer that boosts its dividend by 10% won’t yield 4.4% for very long. Investors will buy its price up and in doing so bid its payout per share back down. And that’s OK. This dividend-powered appreciation is actually the easiest way for us to double our money with safe REITs!

But dividend safety really is the key here.… Read more

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Mortgage payments. Car payments. Cell-phone bills. Power bills. Water bills. Credit card bills.

What do they all have in common?

Nobody likes them, of course. But more importantly, they all arrive relentlessly month after month.

That’s fine when you have a normal job that pays you every couple of weeks or every month. But that regular bill routine becomes considerably more daunting once you hit retirement, when much of your regular income is coming from your portfolio of dividend paying stocks … which pay out every quarter, not every month.

Investors in turn often build complicated dividend calendars that get knocked out of whack whenever they ever have to cut back on certain stocks.… Read more

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