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The Contrary Investing Report > NYSE:SPG

This crisis has caused a lot of folks to develop a crippling fear when it comes to REITs: they see the beating mall owners like Simon Property Group (SPG) have taken and swear REITs off for good. 

To be sure, SPG took it on the chin in March, and has not gotten up:

Simon’s Business Model: Broken for Good

But way too many people think REITs are about shopping malls, and that’s about it. It’s too bad, because this first-level thinking causes them to miss out on a lot of upside—and dividend growth, too.

Beyond the Mall

Members of my Hidden Yields service know better: we wanted nothing to do with mall landlords before this crisis, because Amazon.comRead more

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“Brett, I didn’t sell (insert dividend stock here) in March. Should I hold my nose and sell now?”

If you sat on your hands during the March drop and subsequent bounce, you’re not alone. Many of your fellow income investors are still holding on to positions that they know they should probably sell, but haven’t yet. (I know this because I’ve heard this question from a number of you!)

Well, here’s the question I would ask you about the position:

“Is the business going to rebound to pre-pandemic levels any time soon?”

If the answer is “no” then why would you not sell the stock?… Read more

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Bear markets can be painful, but they also create “once-in-a-decade” buying opportunities for dividend investors. For example, there are four big names yielding between 9.9% and 15.9% that are literally the leaders in their respective industries. (We’ll review them shortly.)

Bull markets simply don’t boast yields anywhere this high. And double-digit yields can drastically change a retirement game plan.

I’ve complained for years that, if you had a million bucks to plunk down on blue chips and bonds, you’d only be able to wring out about $20,000 to $30,000 in dividends and interest each year. But right now, you can take a nest egg half that size, and generate anywhere between $49,500 to $79,500 annually in dividend cash.… Read more

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Landlords and lenders have taken it on the chin since the world shut down. And until this place is actually open for business once again, many REIT (real estate investment trust) investors are unfortunately rolling the dice on the next rent payment coming in, the next commercial mortgage payment being made.

To be fair, however, select REITs are going to be OK, and many of them are selling at bargain prices right now. In the short run, REIT prices can move together (for example, drop when the 10-year Treasury yield rises). However, as weeks turn into months and years, we usually see a great variation in the performance of REIT stocks.… Read more

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If you own any real estate investment trusts (REITs), make sure you forward this article along to your tax advisor!

Historically, REIT distributions have been considered nonqualified dividends by the IRS. This means they usually get taxed at your regular income tax rate.

However, REIT investors now benefit from the same tax break that “pass through” businesses receive. As a general rule, REIT investors are now allowed to deduct 20% of their REIT dividend income.

(This tax update is adapted from our new book How to Retire on Dividends: Earn a Safe 8%, Leave Your Principal Intact. You can grab your copy here.)… Read more

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I want you to think about your very first reaction when you flick on the TV and see the Dow has crashed 300, 500—even 800 points. It feels like you’re drowning, right?

It’s physical, like a gasp after falling into a cold lake. Your first instinct is likely to reach for the closest “life preserver.” For most folks, that means panicking and flipping holding after holding over to cash.

You’ve probably made this mistake. You might’ve made it last Christmas, when many investors, burned by last year’s selloff, threw in the towel …

… just in time to miss the 18% total return stocks have delivered since!… Read more

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Last time we had a July like this, REITs (real estate investment trusts) ran wild. The top plays delivered dividends plus price gains between 40% and 114%!

REIT Rhyme for 114% Returns?

Tell me if this sounds familiar:

  • It was July,
  • The stock market was hitting all-time highs,
  • And the Fed was about to cut rates for the first time in a while.

We shall see if July 2019 continues to “rhyme” with July 1995. Back then, we had Fed Chair Alan Greenspan introduce the concept of the “Greenspan Put,” the inside joke that the Maestro would save any decline in stocks with rate cuts.… Read more

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Another one bites the dust.

That’s what I thought when I saw earlier this month that Sears Holdings (SHLD) was throwing in the towel and filing for bankruptcy.

The news was not too surprising for anyone that’s been following the retail sector, but with nearly 200 Sears and KMart stores that are now slated to close, it could be the blow that knocks some mall REIT dividends to the mat for a 10-count.

That’s because in addition to Sears, Mattress Firm, Brookstone, Claire’s and Bon-Ton are just a few of the retailers that also went under in 2018.

The mall was already on life support before Amazon.com (AMZN) changed the way that consumers shop in the U.S., but this time around, there just aren’t many shops that are willing to take over the vacant “anchor” space.… Read more

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Smart income investors know that the best REITs (real estate investment trusts) do just fine as rates rise. That’s been the case historically, and they’re rally again during this rate hike cycle too.

Why? Because elite landlords simply keep raising their rents.  These higher cash flows translate to higher dividends, and higher stock prices, regardless of what the Fed is up to.

For example, almost three years ago I recommended Medical Properties Trust (MPW) to my Contrarian Income Report subscribers. It was paying nearly 8% at the time – discarded to the bargain bin because the first-level types fretted that higher rates would harm its ability to collect rent checks from its hospital operators.… Read more

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Individual investors tend to gravitate toward stocks trading under $10 for multiple reasons. For one, it can psychologically feel more powerful to buy 100 shares of a company trading for $8 than just eight shares of a $100 name.

While both investments are just as likely to generate attractive returns over time, low-dollar stocks have historically proven to be more volatile. In other words, they can offer active traders more bang for their buck in the short term.

Volatility works both ways, which is why I’ve highlighted two stocks that appear to be trading under $10 for a reason and might not be able to sustain their current dividends.…
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