A Tax Break (Up to 20%!) for Dividend Investors? It’s True

Our Archive

Search completed

The Contrary Investing Report > NYSE:SPG

If you own any real estate investment trusts (REITs), make sure you forward this article along to your tax advisor!

Historically, REIT distributions have been considered nonqualified dividends by the IRS. This means they usually get taxed at your regular income tax rate.

However, REIT investors now benefit from the same tax break that “pass through” businesses receive. As a general rule, REIT investors are now allowed to deduct 20% of their REIT dividend income.

(This tax update is adapted from our new book How to Retire on Dividends: Earn a Safe 8%, Leave Your Principal Intact. You can grab your copy here.)… Read more

Read More

I want you to think about your very first reaction when you flick on the TV and see the Dow has crashed 300, 500—even 800 points. It feels like you’re drowning, right?

It’s physical, like a gasp after falling into a cold lake. Your first instinct is likely to reach for the closest “life preserver.” For most folks, that means panicking and flipping holding after holding over to cash.

You’ve probably made this mistake. You might’ve made it last Christmas, when many investors, burned by last year’s selloff, threw in the towel …

… just in time to miss the 18% total return stocks have delivered since!… Read more

Read More

Last time we had a July like this, REITs (real estate investment trusts) ran wild. The top plays delivered dividends plus price gains between 40% and 114%!

REIT Rhyme for 114% Returns?

Tell me if this sounds familiar:

  • It was July,
  • The stock market was hitting all-time highs,
  • And the Fed was about to cut rates for the first time in a while.

We shall see if July 2019 continues to “rhyme” with July 1995. Back then, we had Fed Chair Alan Greenspan introduce the concept of the “Greenspan Put,” the inside joke that the Maestro would save any decline in stocks with rate cuts.… Read more

Read More

Another one bites the dust.

That’s what I thought when I saw earlier this month that Sears Holdings (SHLD) was throwing in the towel and filing for bankruptcy.

The news was not too surprising for anyone that’s been following the retail sector, but with nearly 200 Sears and KMart stores that are now slated to close, it could be the blow that knocks some mall REIT dividends to the mat for a 10-count.

That’s because in addition to Sears, Mattress Firm, Brookstone, Claire’s and Bon-Ton are just a few of the retailers that also went under in 2018.

The mall was already on life support before Amazon.com (AMZN) changed the way that consumers shop in the U.S., but this time around, there just aren’t many shops that are willing to take over the vacant “anchor” space.… Read more

Read More

Smart income investors know that the best REITs (real estate investment trusts) do just fine as rates rise. That’s been the case historically, and they’re rally again during this rate hike cycle too.

Why? Because elite landlords simply keep raising their rents.  These higher cash flows translate to higher dividends, and higher stock prices, regardless of what the Fed is up to.

For example, almost three years ago I recommended Medical Properties Trust (MPW) to my Contrarian Income Report subscribers. It was paying nearly 8% at the time – discarded to the bargain bin because the first-level types fretted that higher rates would harm its ability to collect rent checks from its hospital operators.… Read more

Read More

Individual investors tend to gravitate toward stocks trading under $10 for multiple reasons. For one, it can psychologically feel more powerful to buy 100 shares of a company trading for $8 than just eight shares of a $100 name.

While both investments are just as likely to generate attractive returns over time, low-dollar stocks have historically proven to be more volatile. In other words, they can offer active traders more bang for their buck in the short term.

Volatility works both ways, which is why I’ve highlighted two stocks that appear to be trading under $10 for a reason and might not be able to sustain their current dividends.…
Read more

Read More

Once again, almost everyone has gotten sucked in by a tired investor slogan that’s dead wrong—and it’s costing them big gains (and income).

But that’s good news for contrarians like us, because we can bank some easy profits thanks to this all-too-predictable reflex.

That’s especially true now that the Federal Reserve has sent out a blaringly obvious signal that it’s stuck to its rate-hike track, calling the economy “strong” after its latest meeting last week.

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. Before I go further, the shopworn myth I’m talking about is that REITs nosedive when interest rates rise.

Many folks just can’t be talked out of it, despite all evidence to the contrary, including the fact that REITs skyrocketed during the last sustained rising-rate cycle, in 2004–06.…
Read more

Read More

It’s a good time to be a virtual landlord. REIT (real estate investment trust) dividends just got a tax break, their stock prices are kicking off a rally and their yields are still on the generous side.

Let’s start with those yields, because that’s why we buy REITs. These firms get a pass from Uncle Sam if they dish most of their profits to us investors as dividends. (This generosity, by the way, has helped REITs outperform the broader stock market for much of their history.)

Current yields are higher than usual today:

REIT Yields are Higher Than Usual

Generally this means that REIT prices are too low (and should be bought).…
Read more

Read More

Make no mistake: The “Mallpocalypse,” the “Retailpocalypse,” whatever you want to call it, is very real, and its shockwaves are being felt in just about every corner of the brick-and-mortar retail world. In fact, there are only a few true havens left – including a few higher yielders in the 5%-6% range. We’ll get to those in a minute.

Every other week, it seems like there’s another story about a retailer going bankrupt or shuttering locations. Just consider some of the store closings lined up for this year:

  • Abercrombie & Fitch (ANF) is going to shut down 60 of its 868 locations in 2018.


Read more

Read More

Let’s assume that higher long-term rates (3%+) are here to stay. Can REITs (real estate investment trusts) and high rates co-exist? Or must there be just one winner in this suddenly one-sided tug of war?

After all, as the 10-year Treasury’s yield has rallied, REITs have suspiciously suffered:

REITs and Rates: Oil and Water?

And the headline arguments against REITs during rising rate periods seem to make sense:

  • REITs need cheap money to grow, and
  • When risk-free assets pay more, income investors will buy them instead of REITs.

These knocks may apply to low-yielding shares, especially static payers, but they historically haven’t applied to firms (REIT or otherwise) that have been able to grow their payouts meaningfully as rates have risen.…
Read more

Read More

Categories