Asset Allocation 101 for Dividend Investors

The Contrary Investing Report

Investing and Trading News, with a Contrarian, Sarcastic Twist!

Last week, we outlined a smart, sound retirement income strategy funded by dividends alone. Now, let’s talk growth.

We’re already well ahead of the flawed 4% fallacy – the notion that you can (or should) sell some capital every year for retirement income. With our “no withdrawal” technique, we’re already keeping our capital intact – and collecting 8% yields to boot!

Believe it or not, we can do even better with some savvy asset allocation. If you’re not yet as filthy rich as you hoped you’d be by now, don’t worry – we still have plenty of time to get you there.…
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Back in February 2016, I wrote an article titled “4 Reasons to Buy This 9.2% Yielding Equity Fund”. That fund was the AGIC Equity and Convertible Income Fund (NIE).

Since then, NIE has done this:

Almost 50% Gains in a Year and a Half

Oh, and did I mention that NIE pays a 7.4% dividend? That’s right: $100,000 in this fund gives you $616 per month in cash.

Despite the conventional wisdom about dividend yields, that high yield doesn’t come with high risks. Not only has NIE been growing its dividend since 2009, but that income stream is well covered by the fund’s investments—again, thanks to its big returns, as we see in the chart above.…
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I’m going to get straight to brass tacks. Let’s discuss 2 closed-end funds with up to 18% upside in the next 12 months, plus yields up to 5.8%. Both are leading a blockbuster trend almost everyone has missed.

I say “almost” because if you’re a canny contrarian (and if you’re reading this I’m betting you are), you probably know what I’m going to say.

I’m talking about the quiet rebound in actively managed funds (that is, funds with real humans in charge), including CEFs.

So far this year, more than half of active managers are beating their benchmarks. And when human stock pickers take the lead, they keep it, like they did from 2001 to 2011.…
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Today, I’m going to warn you about five stocks with yields of 7% or more that should be avoided at all costs. They are my next “dividend disaster” candidates that are likely to either reduce their payouts, or lose 20% or more in price, or both.

Big current yields have nothing to do with safety. Consider these year-to-date performances from high-yielding companies that started 2017 with juicy yields, but at some point cut or suspended their dividends:

  • Windstream: Yielded 7.5%, lost 75%
  • Mattel: Yielded 5.5%, lost 45%
  • GNC: Yielded 7%, lost 26%

I warned you to sell Mattel late last year, before its dividend cut.…
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One thing investors ask me about all the time is return of capital, or ROC.

In a nutshell, these folks are mainly worried that ROC is simply a fund taking your money and paying you a dividend from your money without actually making a positive return on it.

Worse, they’re doing this after taking out their fees, which are much higher than the fees you’d pay on an index fund!

Before you get your pitchfork out, know that this perception of ROC is wrong. In reality, return of capital is often very good for investors.

For starters, ROC isn’t simply a fund taking your money and giving it back to you.…
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How much money do you need to retire on dividends alone?

This is a better question to ask than the typical “magic number” formula that most “first-level” thinking firms tout. Let’s review why their approach is fatally flawed, so that we can derive a more reliable method of our own based in actual reality (and funded by actual dividend payments.)

Fidelity Says What?

You should aim to have 10 times your final salary in savings.

But why? I suppose they are claiming that, if you earned $100,000 in your final year working, that you’ll want to earn this much in income every year for the rest of your life.…
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Any way you slice it, it was a big bet.

I’m talking about the legendary wager Warren Buffett made with hedge fund manager Ted Siedes a decade ago.

You may recall this $500,000 gamble. It went like this: if hedge funds could beat the S&P 500 over a decade, Siedes would win. If not, Buffett would win.

The result: the index crushed the funds Siedes chose, prompting him to concede defeat last May.

He went down fighting, though, writing that it was the hedge funds’ global focus that caused them to underperform, not the prevailing “wisdom” that stock picking is little more than gambling.…
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Today I’m going to show you how to get in on America’s hottest real estate with zero fees and commissions.

And you can buy from the convenience of your brokerage account. Simply by typing in a few stock tickers.

Think about this “zero fee” thing for a moment: with the average realtor whacking clients with 6% in fees and commissions, we’re talking thousands of dollars of savings here!

Instead of paying these commissions, you’ll be able to collect them as monthly or quarterly payouts (or dividends) to fund your retirement. Here’s what you need to do first.

Your Job: Collect the Income

The fat rent checks from the properties we’re going to invest in (more on them below) will soon have you yielding double digits on your original buy.…
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Think it’s time to sell – or avoid – tax-advantaged municipal bonds ahead of the upcoming tax battle?

Think again. There are several compelling reasons why muni bonds are still buys for most income-focused investors.

First, the top federal tax bracket will still be a hefty 35%. Which means, if you’re a top earner, munis will still boost your yield by more than one-third.

No matter what tax plan is approved, municipal bonds will continue to be tax-free at the federal level. The GOP isn’t touching the federal income tax exemption for municipal bonds, which means win or lose, Uncle Sam won’t touch that income (which means tax-equivalent yields up to 9.6%, which we’ll discuss shortly, will still be in play).…
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“First-level” investors – those who buy and sell on headlines – mistakenly believe that real estate investment trust (REIT) profits will suffer if rates rise.

Sure, in the short run, the “rates up, REITs down” theory puts on quite the show. When the 10-Year Treasury’s yield rises, REITs usually fall. And when its yield drops, REITs usually rally. This inverse relationship tends to hold up over multiple days, weeks and even months:

A Short-Run Seesaw Between REITs and T-Bill Yields

The theory backing up this price action says that, because REITs borrow money to grow their property empires, they need cheap cash.…
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About Author

Brett

Hi, I’m Brett Owens – and I’m a financial junkie. My “problem” started incollege, when I got a little dose of the stock market – man, was I hooked…in no time, I was reading the Wall Street Journal religously.

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