5 Discounted Monthly Dividends Paying up to 11.4%

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Every legendary investor worth their salt has some sort of phrase to describe what investors should be doing right this very minute.

“Be fearful when others are greedy, be greedy when others are fearful.”

“Buy when there’s blood in the streets.”

Largely speaking, most stocks on the market are on sale to some extent. And sure, we could go out and make a few targeted bets on these bargains.

But I’d prefer to squeeze even more value out of the stock market.

Enter closed-end funds (CEFs).

Why CEFs Are Our Best Option Now

If we were to go out and buy an exchange-traded fund (ETF) that invests in, say, the Nasdaq Composite or Russell 2000, or really any area of the market you felt was underpriced, you’d be able to enjoy in the collective discounts of all their holdings.… Read more

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Today, the 10-year Treasury pays just 2.4%. Put a million bucks in T-Bills and you’re banking $24,000 per year. Barely above poverty levels!

Hence the appeal of closed-end funds (CEFs), which often pay 8% or better. That’s the difference between a paltry minimum-wage income of $24,000 on a million saved or a respectable $80,000 annually.

And if you’re smart about your CEF purchases, you can even buy these funds at discounts and snare some price upside to boot!

The market’s fast run-up since January 1 has made cheap CEFs just a bit harder to find. And some CEFs have become so pricey that, if you hold them, you should consider selling before their premiums fall to earth.… Read more

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Today I’m going to take you inside the most disrespected, criticized, lambasted and just plain ignored investments on the market today.

Why would I do that?

Simple. Because if you’re not as rich as you’d like to be, these unloved income plays are the perfect way to get you there.

I’m talking about closed-end funds (CEFs), a group of investments that, with a bit of effort (which I’m happy to put in for you) can hand you big, fast upside, safe cash dividends of 8% and higher—or both.

So why do so many investors see CEFs as perennial money losers?…
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