This “Instant” 5-Stock Portfolio Pays $30,000 a Year (Forever)

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The Contrary Investing Report > NYSE:GUT

Today I want to show you how you can retire on $405,000—and with just five buys, too! Put together, these five stocks and funds hand you a 7.4%-yielding portfolio that will pay you reliably for decades.

First, though, let’s quickly run through how our “5-buy” portfolio will work—and how it proves the so-called “experts,” who say you need a million dollars or more to clock out—are dead wrong.

A Million-Dollar Retirement … for $405K!?

To be smack in the middle of income in America, you need to bring in about $30,000 per year. So, at a 7.4% yield, you’d need to invest $405,000.… Read more

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I run into a lot of investors who think retirement investing is a two-act play.

In Act 1, when you’re younger, you try to balloon your nest egg with high-risk growth stocks that pay little (and often no) dividends.

Then, in Act 2, as you near—and enter—retirement, you pivot to the big dividends you need to pay your bills.

Trouble is, this approach exposes you to far too much risk, so today I’m going to show you a better way.

Your Best Play: Big Dividends and Growth—Right Now

I’m talking about 10 funds that can hand you dividends up to 9.8% right now, plus annual returns of 10% or more.… Read more

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I want to show you 10 funds that yield up to 9.4%—and that you should sell now (or steer clear of if you don’t own them).

Of course, near-10% yields are attractive, and I often see attractive funds yielding as much as (and more than) the 10 funds I’ll reveal in a second. But sometimes a big yield is too good to be true, and that’s the case here.

The reason I’m saying this now? These funds have been on a tear in the last few months, which is far out of character for both them and their asset class.

I’m talking about utilities funds.… Read more

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It’s easy to see why investors love utilities:

  1. Low volatility
  2. High yields

But there’s a problem: recent scares like the inverted yield curve mean some utilities, and utility funds, have gotten ahead of themselves and are more prone to a pullback than most folks think. (The three 7%+-yielding closed-end funds (CEFs) I’ll show you shortly top this “overpriced” list.)

The worst part is, many people think utilities are underbought, because the benchmark Utilities Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLU) is up 8.3% year-to-date, half the 16% gain of the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY).

But that’s recency bias. Stretch the timeline to 12 months and things look very different:

Utilities Get Pricey

Interest-Rate Pause Should Boost Utilities.Read more

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Monday’s major jump in stocks is the beginning of a trend that will catch a lot of investors by surprise: fundamental strength thanks to trade war fears abating.

We aren’t out of the woods yet, as Tuesday showed us. While the market cheered the tentative cease-fire between Xi and Trump on Monday, the lack of details and confusion hit the market on Tuesday.

And that’s a good thing, because it’s set up investors for an opportunity to buy equities cheap before the relief rally around the corner.

Trade Ceasefire Opens Buy Window …

The way I see it, the trade-war ceasefire is likely the beginning of a deal coming down the pipe in the next three months.… Read more

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If you’re still fearful about stocks as we pick up the pieces from the market’s grim October, let me ease your mind with one chart:

Stocks Still a Long-Term Winner

As you can see, that’s the market’s return over the last 10 years. As you can also see, stocks have returned nearly 2.5 times a person’s original investment in just a decade! Few other investments can make that claim.

The real problem? Income.

The average S&P 500 stock pays a lousy 1.9%, but let’s say you need 8% of your portfolio in monthly income to pay your bills in retirement. If you buy the popular SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) and withdraw 8% monthly, you’ll be forced to sell in a falling market like the one we’ve seen.… Read more

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Closed-end fund (CEF) investors are going crazy again. This time, they’re grossly overpaying.

Today we’ll discuss five incredibly popular funds that are not likely to become more celebrated, and should be sold immediately.

Yes, first-level income hounds can be as greedy as they are fearful. In January 2016, they wanted nothing to do with CEFs. Exactly when many funds were about to embark on an 18-month tear!

Yet today, they’re willing to pay $1.49 for just $1 in assets. This is a recipe to lose money. Or at best, see your portfolio trade sideways.

This Discount/Premium as Margin of Safety (or Lack Thereof)

CEFs, unlike their mutual fund cousins, have fixed share counts.…
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