This 8.3% Dividend Is Cheap (And Will Rise on Overblown Rate Fears)

The Contrary Investing Report

Investing and Trading News, with a Contrarian, Sarcastic Twist!

Since last week, markets have been hamstrung by the fear that inflation is going to hang around. So we (naturally!) are going to make a contrarian play on this overdone worry.

How? By picking up high-yielding closed-end funds (CEFs) focusing on real estate—particularly real estate investment trusts (REITs). Many of these are discounted now.

I’ll show you why this timely move is our route to locking in a steady (and monthly paid) 8.3% dividend in just a moment

First, let’s break down the so-called “bad” inflation number that came out last week, because there are some quirks about it that are easy to overlook.… Read more

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Be careful how you buy your bonds. The most popular tickers have four “fatal flaws” that’ll doom you to underperformance at best, or at worst leave you hanging in the event of a market meltdown!

Let’s pick on the widely followed and owned iShares iBoxx High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) as an example. It has attracted nearly $17 billion in assets because:

  1. It’s convenient and as easy to buy as a stock.
  2. It’s diversified (for better or worse, as we’ll see shortly) with 1,188 individual holdings.
  3. It pays well, at 6% today.

The accessibility of funds like HYG appears cute and comfortable enough.… Read more

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If you’re a dyed-in-the wool dividend investor (like me!), you’ve likely taken a look at the big gains folks are reaping on AI stocks … and resigned yourself to missing out on the whole thing.

After all, most AI stocks, like Alphabet (GOOGL) and NVIDIA (NVDA), yield 0% (or close to it!). And we simply demand a dividend before we buy anything.

The good news is we don’t have to miss out—instead, we’re going to go one floor up from the “first-level” options that most folks buy to the “penthouse” of AI investments: tech-focused closed-end funds (CEFs)!

The beauty of CEFs is that by going with these high-yield funds (8%+ payouts are run-of-the-mill in CEF-land), we don’t have to sell the blue chips we currently own!… Read more

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At my CEF Insider service, I regularly write about the most effective ways to get big dividends—often double-digit yields—from closed-end funds (CEFs) holding some of the world’s best stocks.

I’m talking about companies like Microsoft (MSFT), Apple (AAPL) and Visa (V) here—three common holdings among equity CEFs.

But you can’t just dial up any of these high-yielding funds (CEFs typically yield north of 7%) and call it a day. To get the most out of your CEF investments, you need to invest a bit of time and effort.

Well, how about this: I’ll save you the work and show you a simple three fund portfolio you can create today that gets you a 7.7% income stream and the confidence to hold these funds for decades to come.… Read more

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These unloved stocks yield between 6.9% and 21.4%. These are big dividends, but not the main reason we are discussing this ignored five today.

Each of these names is so unliked by the Wall Street suits that they have serious upside potential.

How could that be?

These shares are heavily sold short.

Short selling is a way to bet against a stock. To do so, one must borrow the shares and sell them today. In hopes of buying back at a lower price tomorrow.

What happens if the stock goes up tomorrow? And rises the next day? And so on?… Read more

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Don’t fall into the trap of thinking you can’t beat the market. It’s total nonsense—and that goes double if you look outside stocks, to other assets.

Consider preferred stocks for example—they’re “bond-stock” hybrids that trade on an exchange, like stocks. But like bonds, they trade around a par value.

The best part is the income. Our favorite way to buy preferreds—through actively managed (we’ll come back to that in a second) closed-end funds (CEFs)—gets us yields of 7%+.

And select preferred-stock CEFs trade below their net asset value (NAV, or the value of their portfolios) today—with some of those discounts reaching well into double-digits.… Read more

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Happy Valentine’s Day, my dear contrarian. On this day of love and (let’s be honest) fake affection, we are going to take a pass on the Hallmark holiday and focus on something more profitable.

Disgust.

Natural gas did it again! It fell below $2 per million BTUs. These washout levels typically represent a floor for nat gas prices.

Every time it drops below this $2 linoleum level, the price eventually pops and tests the ceiling. Now that we have this ideal setup again, let’s back up the truck!

Death, taxes and the cyclical nature of natural gas are the only three things we contrarians can be certain about!… Read more

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Look, we’re going to get a slowdown here in America this year—two years’ worth of rate hikes are going to hit home. Fact.

So I’m going to suggest we do something you might find a little bit weird: buy US stocks. But not any US stocks—and certainly not “dividend-dud” ETFs like the ever-popular SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (SPY)!

No way.

Instead we’re shopping in the small(er) cap aisle, for stocks in the midcap range kicking out surging dividends. We love these overlooked US-based dividend plays now because:

They’re cheap: while SPY has soared 19% in the last year, midcaps have treaded water, with the Vanguard Mid Cap ETF (VO)—in orange below—up just 4%.… Read more

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One of the worst investing mistakes you can make is blindly sticking to “rules of thumb” given out by so-called “experts.”

That goes double when you use these overly broad guidelines for the most important decision you can make: planning for your financial future.

Consider a recent article by Bankrate telling retirees to follow the “rule of 25,” which is as simple as it is deceptive. This piece tells us that you “should have 25 times the annual amount you plan to spend in retirement saved before you leave the workforce.”

That’s a lot of money! Take a look at the table below to match up how much you plan to spend in retirement (to make things easier, we’ll set inflation aside and use today’s dollars) with how much you’d need to save.… Read more

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When the Wall Street cheerleaders actually dislike a stock—well, that sure commands our contrarian attention.

Today we’ll cover one of my favorite traditions, which is fading the opinions of analysts. You know, the guys who typically slap a Buy rating on everything they see?

It sounds counterintuitive, but we don’t want Buy ratings on our stocks. Give us Holds and Sells and general apathy. Or, even better, disgust.

When every analyst rates a stock a Buy, it feels “safe” to purchase. But really, it’s anything but. With nobody left to upgrade, there is nothing to do but wait for the dreaded downgrade.… Read more

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