This CEF Soared 51.9% in 2019. Time to Sell?

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If you’ve been holding the Cohen & Steers Quality Income Realty Fund (RQI)—a fund I wrote about a lot in 2019—you’ve done very well indeed. RQI has dominated, with its market-price return surging 51.9%, including gains and dividends, since the start of 2019.

So today we’re going to take a closer look at this superstar fund to see what lies ahead, and whether it’s still worthy of your cash, even with its big 2019 gains.

If you’re not familiar with RQI, it owns real estate investment trusts (REITs), such as cell-tower owners Crown Castle International (CCI) and American Tower (AMT), warehouse landlord Prologis (PLD) and data-center REIT Equinix (EQIX).Read more

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How the heck do you fund your retirement today, with regular stocks yielding a pathetic 1.8%?

Today I’m going to show you exactly how—and we’re going to use my favorite tool, closed-end funds (CEFs) to do it. In fact, we’re going to zero in on a particular CEF that’s the poster child for how these high-yielding funds can deliver the retirement you want on a modest nest egg—far less than that million bucks many advisors say you need.

To start, this solid fund pays a steady 6.4% dividend now—nearly four times the payout you’d get from a “regular” stock. Even better for retirees, it pays you that dividend monthly, in line with your bills.… Read more

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Today we’re going to dive into a corner of the market where 6%+ dividends are everywhere. What’s more, the funds behind these payouts have crushed the S&P 500 for decades—even during the financial crisis.

I’ll also introduce you to a specific fund that’s throwing off a 6.7% payout every month, and should be on any income investor’s radar. More on that shortly.

First, I’m talking about real estate—and in particular a group of closed-end funds (CEFs) that hold high-yielding real estate investment trusts (REITs), companies that own properties ranging from seniors’ homes to cell towers.

Yes, real estate—the sector at the heart of the subprime-mortgage crisis.… Read more

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In a second, I’m going to reveal three real estate stocks that are much better than buying rental property of your own.

Why? Because this trio:

  1. Pays a 9.3% dividend, on average—with one yielding an incredible 11%. I think you’ll agree that this is a pretty tough return for most “real” landlords to get.
  2. Takes zero work—you just buy these property-focused stocks and collect your dividends (and price upside!), and
  3. Gets you way more diversification than your typical basement apartment, semi-detached or “box in the sky” condo ever could.

You may have caught on that I’m talking about real estate investment trusts (REITs).… Read more

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You’re no doubt wondering if there’s anywhere you can invest and still get a decent return—without wincing every time you open your brokerage account.

Good news: there is just such a place. And today I’m going to show it to you—along with three specific “crash-resistant” funds yielding up to 7.1%.

The magical place I’m talking about is an often-ignored corner of the market called closed-end funds (CEFs).

Steady Dividends for Rocky Markets

There’s a weird twist that lets CEFs pay us dividends of 7.1% (and a lot higher) without exposing us to the risk of a surprise payout cut.

It comes down to the fact that several CEFs’ prices (on the open market) trade at a discount to the per-share net asset value (or the liquidation value of their portfolios).… Read more

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Pity the poor landlord, stuck with a boatload of hassles: late rent payments, missed payments, tenants who disappear, tenants who trash the place before they leave.

The list of risks with owning rental property goes on and on! All just to (hopefully) collect a rent check at the end of the month.

But there’s a much easier way to rake in steady income from real estate without the hassle of dealing with tenants and other risks of owning property outright.

The best part?

You’ll get an 8% return on your money in cash every single year. And we’re going to do it straight from our brokerage accounts, just as if we’re buying shares of a company like Apple (AAPL)—but without the pathetic 1.4% dividend Tim Cook’s firm pays.…
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I’ve spoken to a lot of investors who are still scared of real estate after the housing bubble burst in 2008. These folks have a lot of cash on the sidelines, and they’re desperate for income, but they’re too scared to jump into real estate.

Usually when investors express these fears, I show them this chart:

Real Estate Beat Stocks in the Real Estate Crash

This is a chart of the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) and the SPDR Dow Jones REIT ETF (RWR). The latter only holds real estate investment trusts (REITs), which are companies that rent out real estate and pass most of the rental income to shareholders as dividends.…
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Mortgage rates reached a new milestone last week, and it’s one of the most important—and underreported—events in economic history.

For the first time ever, 30-year mortgage rates fell below 3.99%, on average. This is stunning for several reasons, but the most important is that the Federal Reserve is actively working to get mortgage rates higher. By increasing its Federal funds interest rate target, the Fed is hoping to make borrowing more expensive for everyone—companies, students and, yes, homebuyers.

But it’s not working.

And perhaps the biggest reason why it’s not working is that bond investors don’t think economic growth is going to strengthen, so they’re effectively daring the Fed to keep raising rates.…
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Buying real estate investment trusts isn’t like buying other stocks; despite their high yields and big long-term returns, REITs require a bit more attention and a bit faster action than more popular dividend-payers, like blue chips and dividend-growth stocks.

But it’s more than just speed and care. To win with REITs, you need to follow three rules—and I’m going to show you those today.

These REIT rules have never been more important than they are now. Broadly, REITs are getting more valuable, but the market is getting more scared of them. This disconnect makes no sense and is partly the reason why two extremely healthy and valuable REITs—Sabra Health Care REIT (SBRA) and Care Capital Properties (CCP) recently merged.

In their announcement, both firms said the merger would save $20 million in costs annually, provide greater diversification and give the new company more cash for expansion. …
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