4 Darling Dividends Amazon Will Crush Next

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Let’s face it: brands are dead—and that’s terrible news for the 4 household names (and their landlords) we need to talk about today.

Research from Scott Galloway, founder of digital-research firm L2, tells the tale.

Galloway looked at the 13 S&P 500 stocks that have beaten the market for five straight years and found something shocking: just one, Under Armour (UA), is a consumer brand.

And as Galloway points out, there’s no way UA will keep that run going.

UA: The Last Brand Standing—for Now

The other 12 names on the list are mostly innovators that have sliced into old-school businesses and flipped them on their heads—think Facebook (FB), Salesforce.com (CRM) and, of course, Amazon.com (AMZN).
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By now you probably either invest in closed-end funds (CEF) or have heard more folks talking about them.

There’s a good reason why: dividends!

With 10-Year Treasuries yielding around 2.3% and your typical S&P 500 stock paying even less—just 1.9%—there’s a very good chance none of the folks you know are clocking dividends that can even beat inflation, let alone provide a decent income stream!

So when an investment comes along throwing off yields of 7%, 9% … even 11%, people take notice.

In a moment, I’ll show you exactly why these outsized yields exist—and how to grab a slice of this cash for yourself.…
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After months of grinding higher, stocks have taken a bit of a breather. And one obscure corner of the market went lower still.

I know I don’t have to tell you that when that happens, contrarians like us are set up for some nice gains, so long as we don’t let emotion cloud our judgment.

And there are indeed some nice gains on tap with 3 cheap funds I’ll tell you about shortly. They’re all closed-end funds, a special kind of investment that throws off eye-popping dividend yields (one of the 3 CEFs I’ll show you yields a hefty 9.3% now!).…
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Don’t take any dividends for granted today. Business disruption is accelerating as entire industries are being eaten alive.

Uber and Lyft? Killed cabs.

Amazon (AMZN)? It’s crushing retail, and starving their REIT landlords right before our very eyes.

And soon, they might team up to offer more same day deliveries – and make more rivals obsolete!

These types of disturbances have added a new layer to contrarian investing. Before, it was as simple as buying stocks when they were out-of-favor and holding them until they became back in vogue. The “Dogs of the Dow” strategy, for example, usually beat the market by banking the highest blue chip dividend yields – a sign that the tide was ready to turn back in the dogs favor.…
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Most of your friends are going to struggle to make any money in U.S. stocks for the next five to seven years. They’re battling not one, not two, but three major headwinds:

  1. Low yields,
  2. High valuations, and
  3. Rising interest rates.

Historically, half of the stock market’s returns (or more, depending on the study you believe) have come from dividends. With the S&P 500 paying just 1.9%, the math isn’t promising.

An expensive market is also problematic because it makes rising multiples unlikely. The S&P index trades for 25-times earnings today – where can it really go from here but down?

Finally, rising interest rates are a concern for many income investors.…
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Warren Buffett doesn’t just beat the market – he makes a mockery of it. Since Buffett took control of Berkshire Hathaway back in the middle of 1965, the conglomerate has more than doubled the average annual gain of the S&P 500.

But here’s something you won’t hear anywhere else – Buffett doesn’t love all of his stocks equally. In fact, there are three dividend dogs that I bet he’d sell today if he could get away with it.

Let’s look at six of Buffett’s current income plays to separate his three buys from his three sells.

SELL – Verizon Communications (VZ)
Dividend Yield: 5%

Verizon Communications (VZ) is technically in the Buffett boat, but it’s not exactly a high-conviction pick anymore.…
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When blue chips get too popular – like the five I’m going to show you today – these “safe stocks” can actually be dangerous to continue holding in your portfolio.

The problem with blue-chip stocks? Call it the “Curse of the Dow.” The Curse says a stock that joins the Dow Jones Industrial Average will essentially hit a wall, underperforming in the ensuing months compared to how it performed before ascension. It’s not perfect, but it’s close – since 1999, 15 of 16 stocks that have joined the Dow have averaged 1% gains over the next six months, but averaged 11% gains in the six months before inclusion.

Why? There are a few factors, but one of the most prevailing is that by the point a stock has joined the Dow, it’s typically nearing the end of its growth ramp and reaching the slower-growth “mature” part of the business cycle. …
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About Author

Brett

Hi, I’m Brett Owens – and I’m a financial junkie. My “problem” started incollege, when I got a little dose of the stock market – man, was I hooked…in no time, I was reading the Wall Street Journal religously.

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