An Easy Nest Egg “Tweak” for Safe 24.8% Gains

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Last week, I showed you a smart monthly income strategy that hands you $3,333 a month on a $500k investment—all in dividends alone.

This easy monthly dividend setup works out to an average 8% yield (or $40,000 a year on our $500k) paid out to you every 30 days like clockwork.

I think you’ll agree this is plenty of cash for many people to clock out on. So today we’re going to talk growth.

Because our $3,333-a-month “8% strategy” already crushes Wall Street’s flawed 4% rule. You know the one: it recommends that you draw down 4% of your nest egg a year by selling stocks to supplement your dividend income.…
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Most people are chasing big dividend payers right now in this “3% world” we live in. Meanwhile, a small group of “hidden yield” stocks are quietly handing smart investors growing income streams PLUS annual returns of 12%, 17.3%, or more.

Let’s talk about how to find these stocks, and bank 12% returns or better every single year, by following a simple two-step formula.

See, everyone wants dividend stocks with good current yields. It’s easy to scan a newspaper or financial website and pick out the stocks that are paying 3%, 4%, 8% or whatever number you might consider “good.”

Yet that’s NOT the right way to pick dividend stocks.…
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The Dividend Aristocrats, as you may well know, are companies that have increased their annual dividends without interruption for at least 25 years. That speaks to a high level of dependability and stability that even many other blue chips can’t claim.

But boy, can they be stingy.

Aristocrats, Or American Debt? It’s Not Even Close

The ProShares S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (NOBL), which faithfully tracks those payout champions that call the S&P 500 index home, collectively yields 1.7% at the moment, which is an almost laughable amount of current yield. The 10-year Treasury isn’t just beating that – at a roughly 2.9% yield, it’s simply clobbering it.…
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The biggest complaints about the Dividend Aristocrats tend to come from new money. That’s because many of them, while generously raising their payouts year after year, offer skinflint yields that average 2.35% – almost right on par with the 10-year T-note.

You can find a little more relief from a similar club: The High Yield Dividend Aristocrats. This is a group of roughly 110 S&P Composite 1500 stocks that has paid and increased dividends for at least 20 consecutive years. It’s slightly less exclusive than the S&P 500 Aristocrats, and doesn’t actually yield much differently on average, but the larger selection includes several higher-yield growers that I want to highlight today.…
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Wall Street’s supposedly elite group of stocks that have increased their annual payouts every year for at least a quarter-century – the “Dividend Aristocrats” – are peddled by advisers and pundits alike as supreme plays for income portfolios. And sure, a select few of them are. We’ll discuss two later today.

But a whole lot more of them are simply “dead money.”

The ProShares S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (NOBL), which invests in the whole lot of dividend royalty, yields 1.9% as I write this. Even a million dollars parked in this fund is generating less than $20,000 in investment income annually.…
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Sometimes it’s best to sell in May and just stay away. Especially when a firm’s dividend stream is being eaten alive by Amazon & Co.

The Wall Street Journal’s Mark Hulbert studied the “summer rally myth” last year – and concluded it is indeed a good time to sell:

“Over the past 60 years, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has produced an average monthly return of just 0.1% during these three summer months, compared with a 0.7% average for all other months.”

Worse, even skilled market timers don’t have much to work with. Hulbert found that over the past 60 years, rallies from June’s lows into highs over the next two months averaged 6.9% — the third-lowest such rally potential, behind (you guessed it) July and August.…
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About Author

Brett

Hi, I’m Brett Owens – and I’m a financial junkie. My “problem” started incollege, when I got a little dose of the stock market – man, was I hooked…in no time, I was reading the Wall Street Journal religously.

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