Three 12%+ Yields: 2 to Avoid, 1 to Buy

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With great yield comes great risk.

A double-digit yielder is a pretty rare thing. Among the 7,000 or so stocks, exchange-traded funds and closed-end funds on the market, a relative handful (135) dole out 10% or more in annual income. And because sky-high yields are often the product of tanking share prices or excessive risk, many of them are traps – and only a select few are worth considering. Today, I’m going to show you a trio of stocks that yield more than 12% and have earned a closer examination.

But first, let me show you just how rough it is for the big-income club.…
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Mortgage rates reached a new milestone last week, and it’s one of the most important—and underreported—events in economic history.

For the first time ever, 30-year mortgage rates fell below 3.99%, on average. This is stunning for several reasons, but the most important is that the Federal Reserve is actively working to get mortgage rates higher. By increasing its Federal funds interest rate target, the Fed is hoping to make borrowing more expensive for everyone—companies, students and, yes, homebuyers.

But it’s not working.

And perhaps the biggest reason why it’s not working is that bond investors don’t think economic growth is going to strengthen, so they’re effectively daring the Fed to keep raising rates.…
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We were inching forward on a busy road in suburban Boston. I looked out our window and asked my friend how much of the retail strip to our right he’d short (if he could).

Joey works for a real estate hedge fund in New York, by the way.

“All of it,” he replied without hesitation.

He paused.

“Sell it all.”

I nodded in agreement. Death by Amazon before our very eyes!

Now you and I don’t normally chat about brick and mortar stores because, quite frankly, who cares about retail stocks. They don’t pay big dividends unless they’re in big trouble, like Macy’s (M) (and its 6.5% mirage yield) right now.…
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Dividend growth is one of the keys to a strong retirement portfolio (and 12% annual gains forever). While any stock boasting a big stated yield is sure to grab your attention, if that dividend isn’t growing, it’s actually shrinking (as inflation eats up more and more of that income every year.)

That’s why I regularly keep my eye on dividend increases … and why I’m looking at a bundle of stocks that are very likely to up the ante on their regular payouts over the next few months.

If you’re an income investor, it’s increasingly important to focus on dividend growth because – guess what? – it’s slowing. Check out the chart below, which shows the S&P 500’s rate of dividend growth has pulled back to its lowest point since 2011. …
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Today, I’m going to show you some of my favorite REITs—and a novel way of buying them that lets you do so for 18% off!

But first, there’s one sector you need to avoid: financials.

In fact, you needed to avoid it two months ago, as I warned back on February 28.

What’s happened since then? Nothing good.

Financials Come Up Short

This underperformance you see in the above chart isn’t surprising, considering financials were up over 30% by the end of February—and you can see from this chart that they reached their top just when I called it:

Snapshot of a Correction

What’s going on here? …
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The annual “sell in May and go away” period for stocks is nearly upon us, and many investors are worried about Wall Street starting to take profits from the market’s go-go run since November. Me? I’m looking for high-quality, high-yield dividend plays that you can buy in May – or June, or July, or whenever – and never sell.

Today, we’re going to discuss two 7%-plus yielders that fit any “no withdrawal” portfolio perfectly.

They are preferred stocks – wonderful “hybrids” that offer aspects of both stocks and bonds. Preferred stocks can trade on an exchange just like any common stock, but they trade around a par value and dole out a fixed regular payment just like a bond.

And the reason they’re called “preferred”? …
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About Author

Brett

Hi, I’m Brett Owens – and I’m a financial junkie. My “problem” started incollege, when I got a little dose of the stock market – man, was I hooked…in no time, I was reading the Wall Street Journal religously.

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