Sprint to Higher Income With These 9 Yield-Boosting REITs

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Smart income investors know that the best REITs (real estate investment trusts) do just fine as rates rise. That’s been the case historically, and they’re rally again during this rate hike cycle too.

Why? Because elite landlords simply keep raising their rents.  These higher cash flows translate to higher dividends, and higher stock prices, regardless of what the Fed is up to.

For example, almost three years ago I recommended Medical Properties Trust (MPW) to my Contrarian Income Report subscribers. It was paying nearly 8% at the time – discarded to the bargain bin because the first-level types fretted that higher rates would harm its ability to collect rent checks from its hospital operators.… Read more

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Individual investors tend to gravitate toward stocks trading under $10 for multiple reasons. For one, it can psychologically feel more powerful to buy 100 shares of a company trading for $8 than just eight shares of a $100 name.

While both investments are just as likely to generate attractive returns over time, low-dollar stocks have historically proven to be more volatile. In other words, they can offer active traders more bang for their buck in the short term.

Volatility works both ways, which is why I’ve highlighted two stocks that appear to be trading under $10 for a reason and might not be able to sustain their current dividends.…
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Once again, almost everyone has gotten sucked in by a tired investor slogan that’s dead wrong—and it’s costing them big gains (and income).

But that’s good news for contrarians like us, because we can bank some easy profits thanks to this all-too-predictable reflex.

That’s especially true now that the Federal Reserve has sent out a blaringly obvious signal that it’s stuck to its rate-hike track, calling the economy “strong” after its latest meeting last week.

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. Before I go further, the shopworn myth I’m talking about is that REITs nosedive when interest rates rise.

Many folks just can’t be talked out of it, despite all evidence to the contrary, including the fact that REITs skyrocketed during the last sustained rising-rate cycle, in 2004–06.…
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It’s a good time to be a virtual landlord. REIT (real estate investment trust) dividends just got a tax break, their stock prices are kicking off a rally and their yields are still on the generous side.

Let’s start with those yields, because that’s why we buy REITs. These firms get a pass from Uncle Sam if they dish most of their profits to us investors as dividends. (This generosity, by the way, has helped REITs outperform the broader stock market for much of their history.)

Current yields are higher than usual today:

REIT Yields are Higher Than Usual

Generally this means that REIT prices are too low (and should be bought).…
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Make no mistake: The “Mallpocalypse,” the “Retailpocalypse,” whatever you want to call it, is very real, and its shockwaves are being felt in just about every corner of the brick-and-mortar retail world. In fact, there are only a few true havens left – including a few higher yielders in the 5%-6% range. We’ll get to those in a minute.

Every other week, it seems like there’s another story about a retailer going bankrupt or shuttering locations. Just consider some of the store closings lined up for this year:

  • Abercrombie & Fitch (ANF) is going to shut down 60 of its 868 locations in 2018.


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Let’s assume that higher long-term rates (3%+) are here to stay. Can REITs (real estate investment trusts) and high rates co-exist? Or must there be just one winner in this suddenly one-sided tug of war?

After all, as the 10-year Treasury’s yield has rallied, REITs have suspiciously suffered:

REITs and Rates: Oil and Water?

And the headline arguments against REITs during rising rate periods seem to make sense:

  • REITs need cheap money to grow, and
  • When risk-free assets pay more, income investors will buy them instead of REITs.

These knocks may apply to low-yielding shares, especially static payers, but they historically haven’t applied to firms (REIT or otherwise) that have been able to grow their payouts meaningfully as rates have risen.…
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“First-level” investors – those who buy and sell on headlines – mistakenly believe that real estate investment trust (REIT) profits will suffer if rates rise.

Sure, in the short run, the “rates up, REITs down” theory puts on quite the show. When the 10-Year Treasury’s yield rises, REITs usually fall. And when its yield drops, REITs usually rally. This inverse relationship tends to hold up over multiple days, weeks and even months:

A Short-Run Seesaw Between REITs and T-Bill Yields

However the “long view” shows that many of these short-term moves are merely noise. It is possible for REITs and higher rates to coexist in profitable harmony:

But Long-Run REITs and High Rates Can Co-Exist

Investors who are bailing on REITs are missing out, because they are currently paying their highest yields this decade:

Highest REIT Yields Since the Financial Crisis

Most income hounds get it wrong.…
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With great yield comes great risk.

A double-digit yielder is a pretty rare thing. Among the 7,000 or so stocks, exchange-traded funds and closed-end funds on the market, a relative handful (135) dole out 10% or more in annual income. And because sky-high yields are often the product of tanking share prices or excessive risk, many of them are traps – and only a select few are worth considering. Today, I’m going to show you a trio of stocks that yield more than 12% and have earned a closer examination.

But first, let me show you just how rough it is for the big-income club.…
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Mortgage rates reached a new milestone last week, and it’s one of the most important—and underreported—events in economic history.

For the first time ever, 30-year mortgage rates fell below 3.99%, on average. This is stunning for several reasons, but the most important is that the Federal Reserve is actively working to get mortgage rates higher. By increasing its Federal funds interest rate target, the Fed is hoping to make borrowing more expensive for everyone—companies, students and, yes, homebuyers.

But it’s not working.

And perhaps the biggest reason why it’s not working is that bond investors don’t think economic growth is going to strengthen, so they’re effectively daring the Fed to keep raising rates.…
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We were inching forward on a busy road in suburban Boston. I looked out our window and asked my friend how much of the retail strip to our right he’d short (if he could).

Joey works for a real estate hedge fund in New York, by the way.

“All of it,” he replied without hesitation.

He paused.

“Sell it all.”

I nodded in agreement. Death by Amazon before our very eyes!

Now you and I don’t normally chat about brick and mortar stores because, quite frankly, who cares about retail stocks. They don’t pay big dividends unless they’re in big trouble, like Macy’s (M) (and its 6.5% mirage yield) right now.…
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About Author

Brett

Hi, I’m Brett Owens – and I’m a financial junkie. My “problem” started incollege, when I got a little dose of the stock market – man, was I hooked…in no time, I was reading the Wall Street Journal religously.

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