2 “Dead Money” Dividend Aristocrats to Avoid (and 2 to Buy Instead)

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Wall Street’s supposedly elite group of stocks that have increased their annual payouts every year for at least a quarter-century – the “Dividend Aristocrats” – are peddled by advisers and pundits alike as supreme plays for income portfolios. And sure, a select few of them are. We’ll discuss two later today.

But a whole lot more of them are simply “dead money.”

The ProShares S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (NOBL), which invests in the whole lot of dividend royalty, yields 1.9% as I write this. Even a million dollars parked in this fund is generating less than $20,000 in investment income annually.…
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If you’re like most folks, you’re about to put your portfolio on autopilot as the lazy days of summer roll in.

It’s an easy trap to fall into, but you must not take the bait, as I’ll explain in a moment. Later on, I’ll show you two hidden dividend-growers that should be on your buy list now. Both are ready to double their payouts in short order!

First, back to the season at hand.

I can see why most folks check out around now. After all, July has been the best month for stocks over the last 89 years, and August hasn’t been too bad, either.…
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Most folks buy closed-end funds for one reason: big yields!

But that’s not the only reason—and depending on your situation, it may not even the best reason for you, as I’ll show you shortly. (I’ll also reveal 3 tricky, but easily avoidable, blunders many folks make with CEFs).

First, there’s no doubt CEF payouts are legendary.

According to BlackRock’s latest quarterly update, dividend yields range from an average of 2.25% in the lowest-paying CEF sector (emerging market equity) to 9.9% in the highest paying (municipal-bond funds). (The muni-bond fund yield is on a tax-equivalent basis and based on a 43.4% tax rate, as munis are exempt from federal income tax):

A Rich Hunting Ground for Yield Fans

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About Author

Brett

Hi, I’m Brett Owens – and I’m a financial junkie. My “problem” started incollege, when I got a little dose of the stock market – man, was I hooked…in no time, I was reading the Wall Street Journal religously.

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